Learn How To Run with Proper Form To Increase Efficiency, Run Faster, And Stay Injury-Free.

Our detailed biomechanical video analysis and online course will help you run with proper form by teaching you the science of running biomechanics and identifying flaws in your own form while providing you with a simple-to-follow, progressive set of exercises, drills and mental cues to help you make lasting changes to your form.

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*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don't have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it's an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate - although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

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Course is Self-Paced & Available Forever. Start, Pause and Finish Whenever It's Convenient for You

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A note from Jeff Gaudette

Are you confused by all the conflicting information about what proper running form really is? Tired of sorting through the hype and one-size-fits-all approach of marketed running styles?

The truth is, there is no single best way to run.

Actually, let me rephrase that. There probably is some biomechanically perfect way to run based on the laws of physics and optimal efficiency. Unfortunately, due to your individual biological makeup, it's virtually guaranteed that YOUR optimal and best running form is going to differ slightly (or maybe even dramatically) from this biomechanical "optimum".

So, if there isn't an exact way to run, what the heck is this course all about?

Our goal is to develop the optimal and perfect running form for YOU.

To do this, we start by conducting an in-depth video analysis of your current running technique while also teaching you the basics of running biomechanics. We'll educate you by using an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process that breaks down each aspect of the gait cycle into easy to understand sections.

No marketing, no bullshit. Just proven information verified by the latest research on running mechanics.

Once you've had your video analysis and understand the elements of proper form, we'll assign you very specific drills, strength exercises, and dynamic stretches designed to help your body develop the strength, flexibility and awareness to move through the gait cycle as it was designed.

This structure and progression will address your strengths and weaknesses to develop a biomechanically sound running style adapted to your biological uniqueness.

You Don't Need To Be An Exercise Scientist To Learn

This course isn't designed for runners with advanced degrees in kinesiology or anatomy, or those that have published papers in research journals.

While we utilize the latest research to support every claim and recommendation, we keep it simple by using relevant examples, demonstrating every movement (using both good and bad examples) and not getting bogged down in technical jargon.

We tell you what you need to know in a simple, easy to understand way.

Designed With Love

I've been obsessed with running mechanics since I first picked up a copy of "Explosive Running" by Dr. Michael Yessis. I knew exploring the weaknesses in my own running form could lead to faster times and fewer injuries. Over the years, I've poured over research, watched countless hours of elite runners in slow motion, and experimented with every bit of information I could find.

But, when athletes I coach would ask me how to improve their own form, I couldn't point them to a simple answer.

You see, changing one aspect of your form doesn't occur in isolation.

For example, I coached a runner who was convinced she needed to start running on her forefoot after reading an article in RunnersWorld about how heel striking was bad.

So, she started consciously trying to land on her forefoot. Unfortunately, she didn't address her posture or lack of hip extension in the process. She simply focused on changing her foot strike.

The result? She got a stress fracture...Why? Because without first addressing her posture and hip extension, she was still over striding significantly. She simply transferred the impact force from her heel to her forefoot, which created stress in her metatarsal wasn't ready for.

This is when it clicked for me.

Runners shouldn't be going around willy nilly, reading the latest article about "proper form" and then trying to change one singular aspect. They need a comprehensive, step-by-step plan that addresses how to improve form in a logical fashion.

More importantly, they need a plan to develop the strength, flexibility and awareness to allow their body to make these gradual changes.

And that's exactly what this course is all about. Helping you understand what good running form is and how to make proper, logical progressions to run more efficiently.

If you're looking for a secret answer or a get rich quick type solution, this course isn't for you. But, if you really want to learn and you're willing to work to improve your running, I guarantee you'll love this course.

Get It Now

*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don't have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it's an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate - although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

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What's Included

"We provide you with a complete and detailed video analysis of your current form and a 6-week course designed to help you understand and make gradual, lasting changes to your form."

  • A complete video analysis of your current form and specific recommendations
  • A lecture on the basics and science behind each movement in the gait cycle.
  • An advanced discussion with a guest instructor that explores your questions and digs deep into the specific topic.
  • An outline for the week on when to perform each drill and exercise routine (foundational strength, form-specific drills and exercises, stretches, and mental cues) and demonstrations for everything.

Here's a list of lessons

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Detailed Video Analysis

Video Analysis

We'll send you detailed instructions for how to record yourself running (either on a treadmill, track or road) and a simple form to upload your finished videos to our staff. Once uploaded, our staff will begin to analyze and breakdown your form from head to toe using specialized software.

Detailed Assessment

Our staff will provide you a detailed breakdown that includes information on stride length, hip drop, posture, foot pronation and any other aspect of your form that needs to be improved. More importantly, we'll provide specific recommendations for how to fix.

running gait video analysis

Detailed Video Analysis

Module 1 - Introduction To Running Biomechanics

Module Synopsis

In this module, you'll learn the basics of how the stride works so that you develop the foundational knowledge to understand, visualize, and feel the changes you need to make.

Understanding proper running form begins with what we call the gait cycle. The gait cycle is what we call the entire process of your foot landing on the ground, pulling back and then cycling forward again. We'll cover the two phases of the gait cycle (the stance phase and the recovery phase) and the fours stages of the stance phase in detail.

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Module 1 - Introduction To Running Biomechanics

Guest Lecturer

Dr. Heiderscheit is co-director of the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and director of the Runners' Clinic through the University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Center.

One of the ongoing projects being studied by Dr. Heiderscheit and his colleagues at the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Lab is analyzing the effects of increasing a runner's step rate so as to reduce the amount of energy absorbed in the lower extremity joints.

A photo of Dr. Bryan Heiderscheit

Dr. Bryan Heiderscheit

Exercises and Routines

Just like you're building your foundation of knowledge in this first module, you'll be assigned what we call "foundational" strength exercises, drills and dynamic stretches in this module. This ensures you begin to develop the proper strength and flexibility for the more advanced and specific routines in the coming modules.

Routines include - Foundational Strength Routine I, Foundational Drills Routine, Introduction to Active Isolated Stretching.

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Module 2 - Posture and Arm Carriage

Module Synopsis

When it comes to changing form, it's important to start at the top of the kinetic chain, which means first focusing on posture and arm carriage.

In this module, we look at arm carriage and arm swing and outline what role the arms play, why it's important to have efficient arm swing, and what good arm swing should look like. Then, we'll examine the anatomy and physics of proper posture, why it matters, and what proper posture should look and feel like.

By the end of this module, you'll understand what proper running posture should be, how your arms should move, and know exactly how to fix any issues you have.

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Module 2 - Posture and Arm Carriage

Guest Lecturer

Dr. Lehman is a physiotherapist and Strength and Conditioning Specialist whose focus is on running mechanics and running injuries.

With over 20 research publications to his name and extensive clinical experience, he is widely considered one of the foremost experts in running mechanics.

A photo of Dr. Greg Lehman

Dr. Greg Lehman

Exercises and Routines

In this module, you advance to the next level of foundational exercises, which further challenge your balance and functional strength. You also begin the specific exercises, drills and stretches for posture and arm carriage.

Routines included - Foundational Strength II, Posture and Arms Drills Routine, Posture and Arms Strength Routine, AIS Posture Routine.

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Module 3 - Hip Extension

Module Synopsis

In this module, you will learn how to generate proper hip extension to run with a more powerful and more efficient stride.

Hip extension is the act of driving your entire upper thigh (and leg) backwards after your foot contacts the ground. Hip extension acts as the throttle for how fast you're able to run. The more powerful your hip extension, the faster you will go.

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Module 3 - Hip Extension

Guest Lecturer

Matt is a run conditioning coach, video gait analyst and sports massage therapist with over 20 years experience working with runners of all ability levels.

He contributes almost all the running technique articles to the RunnersConnect site and is our "go to" source with questions on running technique.

A photo of Matt Phillips

Matt Phillips

Exercises and Routines

The exercises and routines in this module are all focused on helping you develop specific power and flexibility in your hips so you can fire the right muscles at the right time to generate the hip extension you need to run faster and more efficiently.

Routines include - Foundational Strength II, Hip Extension Strength Routine, Hip Extension Drills Routine, AIS for Hips, Glutes and Hip Flexors.

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Module 4 - Push Off, Recovery & Knee Lift

Module Synopsis

In this module, we'll discuss push off and the recovery phase so that you can maximize your efficiency and ensure you're not wasting any energy in your stride.

Questions answered in this module: What should you do during push off and after the leg leaves the ground? Should you focus on pushing off from your ankle, curling the hamstring towards the butt or driving your knee forward? If so, how much and what is optimal?

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Module 4 - Push Off, Recovery & Knee Lift

Guest Lecturer

Jay Dicharry, MPT, SCS, is the author of Anatomy for Runners, widely considered one of the best books on running form and injuries. He has published over 20 journal articles on running, teaches nationally to clinicians, coaches, the running industry, and athletes, and serves as Director of the REP Biomechanics Lab in Bend, OR.

A photo of Jay Dicharry

Jay Dicharry

Exercises and Routines

This module of exercises advances the foundational strength routine and focuses on developing flexibility and strength in the hamstrings and hip flexors to help make the recovery phase more efficient.

Routines include - Foundational Strength III, Hamstring Strength Routine, Recovery Drills, ASI for hamstrings, calves and hip flexors.

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Module 5 - Foot Strike & Cadence

Module Synopsis

Despite being the most discussed aspect of running form, your exact footstrike isn't as important as where and when your foot hits the ground in relation to your center of mass.

We're going to outline the different types of footstrikes, look at the research on injury-rates of different footstrikes, and discuss the primary method to improve footstrike, cadence.

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Module 5 - Foot Strike & Cadence

Guest Lecturer

Pete is the man behind the popular blog, RunBlogger and author of the book Tread lightly. His academic research as an exercise physiologist and his constant experimentation on himself has lead Pete to be one of the most respected authorities on foot strike and shoes.

A photo of Pete Larson

Pete Larson

Exercises and Routines

You'll continue with the most advanced foundational strength routine and add the specific exercises and drills to help you improve your ability to land with your foot directly under your center of mass.

Routines include - Foundational Strength III, Footstrike Drills Routine, Footstrike Strength Routine, AIS for Lower Legs.

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Module 6 - Fixing Common Problems

Module Synopsis

In this module, we address how to correct specific common form problems. Topics include overstriding, low cadence, splayed feet, lack of knee lift, excessive hip drop and other common issues.

There is not a lecture for this module, just explanations on why each issue occurs and specific exercises and drills to fix.

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Module 6 - Fixing Common Problems

Guest Lecturer

Dr Davis is the Director of the Spaulding National Running Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Davis has given nearly 300 lectures both nationally and internationally and authored over 100 publications on the topic of lower extremity mechanics during running. She has been featured on ABC World News Tonight, Good Morning America, Discovery, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Parade and Time Magazine.

A photo of Dr. Irene Davis

Dr. Irene Davis

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*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don't have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it's an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate - although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

 

So How Much Does It All Cost?

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$149

Buy Now

*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don't have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it's an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate - although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

Detailed Video Analysis

Our staff will provide you a detailed breakdown that includes information on stride length, hip drop, posture, foot pronation and any other aspect of your form that needs to be improved. More importantly, we'll provide specific recommendations for how to fix.

running gait video analysis

Lessons

An image of a chalkboard icon displaying the title of the module

In this module, you'll learn the basics of how the stride works so that you develop the foundational knowledge to understand, visualize, and feel the changes you need to make.

An image of a chalkboard icon displaying the title of the module

In this module, we look at arm carriage and arm swing and outline what role the arms play, why it's important to have efficient arm swing, and what good arm swing should look like. Then, we'll examine the anatomy and physics of proper posture, why it matters, and what proper posture should look and feel like.

An image of a chalkboard icon displaying the title of the module

In this module, you will learn how to generate proper hip extension to run with a more powerful and more efficient stride.

An image of a chalkboard icon displaying the title of the module

In this module, we'll discuss push off and the recovery phase so that you can maximize your efficiency and ensure you're not wasting any energy in your stride.

An image of a chalkboard icon displaying the title of the module

Despite being the most discussed aspect of running form, your exact foot strike isn't as important as where and when your foot hits the ground in relation to your center of mass. In this module we're going to outline the different types of foot strikes, look at the research on injury-rates of different foot strikes, and discuss the primary method to improve foot strike, cadence.

An image of a chalkboard icon displaying the title of the module

In this module, we address how to correct specific common form problems. Topics include over-striding, low cadence, splayed feet, lack of knee lift, excessive hip drop and other common issues.

There is not a lecture for this module, just explanations on why each issue occurs and specific exercises and drills to fix.

Instructions

Foundation Exercises

3 progressive foundational strength routines.

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Specific Strength Routines

4 unique sets of exercises that address the specific aspect of form covered in each module.

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Drills

4 unique routines that target each element of your mechanics.

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Active Stretching

5 unique stretching routines.

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Guest Lecturers

A photo of Dr. Bryan Heiderscheit

Dr. Bryan Heiderscheit

Dr. Heiderscheit is co-director of the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and director of the Runners' Clinic through the University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Center. One of the ongoing projects being studied by Dr. Heiderscheit and his colleagues at the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Lab is analyzing the effects of increasing a runner's step rate so as to reduce the amount of energy absorbed in the lower extremity joints.

A photo of Dr. Greg Lehman

Dr. Greg Lehman

Dr. Lehman is a physiotherapist and Strength and Conditioning Specialist whose focus is on running mechanics and running injuries. With over 20 research publications to his name and extensive clinical experience, he is widely considered one of the foremost experts in running mechanics.

A photo of Matt Phillips

Matt Phillips

Matt is a run conditioning coach, video gait analyst and sports massage therapist with over 20 years experience working with runners of all ability levels. He contributes almost all the running technique articles to the RunnersConnect site and is our "go to" source with questions on running technique.

A photo of Jay Dicharry

Jay Dicharry

Jay Dicharry, MPT, SCS, is the author of Anatomy for Runners, widely considered one of the best books on running form and injuries. He has published over 20 journal articles on running, teaches nationally to clinicians, coaches, the running industry, and athletes, and serves as Director of the REP Biomechanics Lab in Bend, OR.

A photo of Pete Larson

Pete Larson

Pete is the man behind the popular blog, RunBlogger and author of the book Tread lightly. His academic research as an exercise physiologist and his constant experimentation on himself has lead Pete to be one of the most respected authorities on foot strike and shoes.

A photo of Dr. Irene Davis

Dr. Irene Davis

Dr Davis is the Director of the Spaulding National Running Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Davis has given nearly 300 lectures both nationally and internationally and authored over 100 publications on the topic of lower extremity mechanics during running. She has been featured on ABC World News Tonight, Good Morning America, Discovery, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Parade and Time Magazine.

$149

Buy Now

*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don't have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it's an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate - although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

Too Expensive?

If you want a smaller, less expensive package, we've got an option for you.

Maybe the video analysis is too much, you don't have a camera, or you want to use a local biomechanist.

Either way, you can purchase the course without the video analysis.

Want To Know More?
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Here's What You'll Get

  • 6 Video lectures that detail the basics and science behind each movement in the gait cycle using easy-to-understand and visualize examples
  • 7 Guest lectures that cover advanced topics and answer your questions
  • 8 Strength routines focused on improving your form
  • 8 Stretching and running drill routines to help you develop the flexibility and awareness to run with proper form
  • An outline for the week on when to perform each drill and exercise routine with video and pdf demonstrations for every exercise

*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don’t have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it’s an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate – although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

 

What If I'm Not Feeling The Love?

We put years of thinking and hours of research into the exact progression, order, and format of these lectures and routines. I am confident that this course will have absolutely everything you need to intelligently improve your form as well as answer every question you've ever had about running mechanics.

So, check out the full course, watch the lectures, and implement the guidelines into your training over the next month or during your next training cycle. If you don't see progress or you're not satisfied in any way, I'll give you a full, 100% money back refund.

That's right! If you're not happy with the course - for any reason or at any time - I will refund your payment 100%. No questions asked, no fine print.

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"If you're not happy, I'm not happy and I want to make it right"

If you've been suffering from injuries, confused about all the talk on proper running form, or want to take your performance to the next level, don't wait around.

Lots of people say that "someday" they will take that next step. But for most people, "someday" never comes. If you've made it this far, that's not you. Get everything you need now and start the learning process that will change your running forever.

And don't forget there is a 100% Moneyback Guarantee if you're not happy for any reason at all.
No questions asked, no fine print
.

$149

Buy Now

*some exercises require equipment

If you are not a member at a gym, you will also need some equipment for the routines assigned in Modules 2-6. If you don't have these, they can be purchased online. While I know it's an additional cost, you will be able to use them continually after this course is completed.

You can purchase any set you prefer, but here are links to the specific sets we used in the videos: Theraband Set, Medicine Ball (we recommend 4lbs for beginners and 8lbs for intermediate - although you can go heavier if you want), Swiss Ball (a medium size ball (65cm) is fine.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch. We'll be more than happy to answer any of your questions.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to start this course right now?

No, you can start any time. The course is entirely self-paced. So, you can start whenever is right for you. If something comes up, you can pause and start back up when you have more time.

How long do I have access to the course and material?

Forever. The course content and any updates will be available to you forever. You can even download everything to have access at your fingertips with no internet connection needed.

How does this course integrate with your strength training for runners program?

Perfectly! Since we designed both, they compliment each other well. If you're in the early stages of the strength program, you can supplement the exercises in the form course to ensure proper muscle activation. If you're in the specific phase of the strength program, you can learn the material and implement the form exercises after your goal race. The routines have very little overlap - these form routines are almost entirely all new.